Straube Center in the News

December 3, 2012 interview with Win Straube by Kinisuke Kobayashi for “Japanese Art World.”

Q:
What is the difference between Ebu-Arts and all other forms of two- or three-dimensional art?

A:
Ebu-Arts is ebullient art, art made from art.  Maybe most significantly:  Ebu-Arts is close-up art composed of detailed art. If you want to compare Ebu-Arts to art in general, or graphical art in particular, then conventional art is the view you have from a spaceship approaching earth.  You see a beautiful ball with blue, white, and brown shapes, like a painting, which gives you colors, shapes, concepts and outlines.  That's the view and presentation of most art; you see it from a distance. Ebu-Arts works consist of a number of individual pieces of art each individual in message and form, combined into a larger whole with own meaning and expression.  In other words, coming from space, the view changes when you break through the clouds and see the rivers, the forests, the jewels of cities below, see their connectedness and relation to each other. You need to stand up close to Ebu-Arts pieces to SEE ebullient components joined for a common purpose in comprehensive formation. Ebu-Arts means precious values with their own worth and history being part of a greater community of yet higher purpose and value.

Q:
Do we really need another form of art?  Specifically Ebu-Arts?  Why are you doing this?

A:
Just because.

If creativity is a form of schizophrenia, as recent brain research suggests, producing Ebu-Arts works is ONE form of treating the disease.

I am doing it merely because I have to ... have to give expression to specific knowledge, feelings, and connections I know exist, which I have accumulated, stored within me, wanting to get out.

I do it because I want to. Also it gives me great pleasure and satisfaction when doing so.

Q:
Who are you trying to please with your works?  Which audience do you wish to appeal to?  What standards do you want to meet or exceed?

A:
None in particular. My producing a piece is the purpose in itself, like creating a new molecular structure for its own purpose, to be the best and most unique it can possibly be just for itself, in a world of many many unique structures and designs.

Thus I cater to no one.  Nor am I looking for any rewards. In the contrary, I thoroughly enjoy the creation of these information- and treasure-loaded totally new and unique cosmic components. That is my reward.

Q:
Is there a market for Ebu-Arts works?  Particularly for yours?  Where would people find your art?  

A:
There does seem to be a market.  First, of course, we have the Ebu-Arts Museum in New Jersey which has a selection of Ebu-Arts works, not only mine, but from others, too.  Second, the web nowadays is probably the largest market place, open 24 hours a day 7 days a week, spanning the globe.  To have a look at that market place, you can make a start by going to www.ebu-arts.org.  Third, there are museums, art dealers and distributors who have, for example, some of my Ebu-Arts prints in stock, including in Asia and in Europe.

Q:
What prices are your Ebu-Arts pieces fetching?

A:
The original Ebu-Arts #1 brought $60,000.00.  Ebu-Arts #2, bought by a European collector, went for $74,000.00. Ebu-Arts #4, also titled “The East-West Connection,” was bought by a Japanese group just the other day for 6.6 million Japanese Yen (approx. US$81,000.00). Presently, there are no more original Win Straube Ebu-Arts pieces for sale.  

High-resolution archivable 115% enlarged reproducible copies sell for between 8 to 10 thousand U.S. Dollars a piece.  Limited edition prints of the same size, stamped, signed, and dated, are $888.00.  Posters of the same size go for below US$20.

Q:
I understand that the Ebu-Arts Museum has set up an annual $10,000 prize, the first one of which was won by Guy Whitby from Australia.  Why not rather give that money to a charity?  To somewhere were it is needed?

A:
If I may continue your thought, why not pay it in taxes because our government has these great needs and knows best where to spend it or who to subsidize?  Instead of supporting frivolity?

So the reason is, first, because too much government as well as charitable money goes to what are the best organized welfare receiving or otherwise charitable organizations around the world.  It is laudable for anyone to be charitable, minimizing the effects of want of one kind or another.  Yet often, I find, apparent “charity” is exercised rather as a palliative to a personal or communal guilt feeling, frequently dispensed in a paternalistic manner.

Instead, and this is the second and main reason, I want to do, in my small way, what the government and the paternalists are NOT doing, namely, such as providing incentive and reward for the creation of totally new forms, methods, and skills, expanding our universe from the way we know it.  THAT is how homo erectus became homo sapiens, by SEEING and understanding more, drawing new conclusions, creating a newer, far more versatile world.

THAT's what the annual Ebu-Arts prize is all about.  Working on what is really important for making a better world and living a more productive life:  Create something frivolous!  More enjoyable.  More valuable.  And in this case, win a prize for it.

By the way, I am currently the provider of over 90% of the funding of the Straube Foundation (since 1995), which is a 501/C charitable organization supplying conventional charitable contributions in the field of education.  But that is a different story.

One Straube Center Blvd • Pennington, NJ 08534 • Phone: 609-737-3322 • E-mail:
Straube Center Boulevard surrounded by Route 31, West Franklin Ave., Knowles Ave.-Bixby’s Way, and Broemel Place